NEED BRAND

GROWTH?

INNOVATE WITH CONFIDENCE!

VIRTUAL STORE RESEARCH TO CONFIDENTLY PREDICT BRAND BUSINESS IMPACT

One of the core ingredients of actively fostering marketing innovation is effective management of risk with actionable data and insights. With V-Shopper, marketers can easily test marketing ideas through a virtual store (with real-store shelves) to confidently predict the impact on shopper behavior, business results and brand perception. Shopper analytics include:

  • SHOPPER FACTS  (observed behavior)
  • SHOPPER INSIGHTS  (attitudes & perceptions)

V-Shopper has many unique advantages over competing solutions with proprietary VR tech.

OCULAR LENS

Accurately Tracks Shopper Eye Movement

UNIQUE EYE TRACKER

The level of shopper attention a brand receives instore can significantly impact sales – Not Seen Not Bought!

Only V-Shopper has the proprietary online VR technology to Accurately Track Shopper Eye Movement.

Shoppers are asked to shop as they normally would. They use the Ocular Lens like a magnifying glass to browse products on the shelf and Control it with their Mouse. The Ocular Lens places shoppers about 18″ from the shelf.

Of note, a webcam cannot accurately track eye movement given product density of store shelves and most respondents find it highly intrusive.

SHOPPER FACTS

Measuring Observed Shopper Behavior

MEASURABLE IMPACT

Shopper Facts are actionable data points from measured shopper behavior. Shopper facts measured through a virtual store have a very strong correlation with in-market shopper behavior (confirmed as a .85 correlation through multiple independent tests that were run by 2 US universities, along with Kraft General Foods).

Benchmark brand in-store presence and purchase conversion vs control and competitors. Also, measure how long it takes to find the brand in-store.

SHOPPER INSIGHTS

Attitudes & Perceptions

LIKABILITY & INTEREST SCORING

Shoppers are asked to respond to marketing stimuli by clicking on 3 things, those of most interest. They are also asked to rate and comment on whatever they clicked on. Responses can be cross-tabbed with shopping data to better understand the drivers behind shopping results.

BRAND PERCEPTION MAP

Shoppers rate their perception of the brand against a list of targeted brand attributes. This rating method can also be done using a forced preference format to compare more than one piece of marketing stimuli head to head.

Confirms whether the marketing stimuli effectively supports desired brand attributes. The insights gained here can also be cross-tabbed with shopping behavior to better understand the drivers behind shopping results.

SOLUTIONS

Virtual Store Test Market Solutions

PACKAGE DESIGN

Measuring a pack design for its effectiveness at the moment-of-truth instore comes down to answering 5 core questions:

  1. Is the current or proposed pack design garner a competitive level of shopper attention in-store?
  2. Does the new design(s) out-perform the current design?
  3. Can a targeted pack SKU be found in less than 12 seconds?
  4. Does it pack design and communication generate a competitive level of shopper desire as measured by purchase conversion?
  5. Does perceived brand sensibility support targeted brand attributes?

All of the factors can impact business results. Virtual store test markets answer all of these questions with actionable analytics.

NEW PRODUCTS

Virtual store test marketing methodology has 3 key advantages over traditional “purchase intent” research:

  1. Observed shopper behavior is a much better proxy for predicting business impact (.85 correlation) – an extensive body of research documents the significant delta between what people say and what they do.
  2. Unlike purchase intent research approach, virtual store test markets measure results using varying levels of brand awareness (best and worst case scenarios)
  3. Testing in-store adds critical contextual success variables to the mix: brand in-store presence, findability, and competitors

BRANDING

Branding (advertising, naming, positioning and/or claims) is best evaluated by measuring BOTH business impact and attitudes/ perceptions.

Virtual store test markets enable many options to be tested easily and quickly. Contrast this with trying to measure business impact with an in-market test market:

  1. Will take many months to get enough data to make a decision
  2. Challenge to isolate the impact of other variables on results
  3. Limiting in terms of testing alternatives and optimizing
  4. Cannot directly connect attitudes and perceptions with shopping behavior

Branding test market solution provides the flexibility of exposing specific branding stimuli to respondents before they shop. As such, the branding stimuli is the one variable that changes between test cells and can be attributed to impacting both shopping behavior and attitudes/ perceptions. 

MERCHANDISING

Merchandising is all about attracting more shopper attention and converting that into $ sales.

By testing merchandising concepts (on or off-shelf) through a virtual store test market you will be able to accurately measure how it impacts both shopper attention and business results.

PRICING

 Very Cost Effective Option

Virtual Store Test Markets Start at $5k.

 

PRICING VARIABLES INCLUDE: 

The number of respondents, respondent incidence rate %, number of test cells, number of stores and SKU density on-shelf. 

Book a time to discuss in more detail.

#04

HOW FINDABLE IS YOUR BRAND?

HOW FINDABILITY IS MEASURED & WHY IT MATTERS
V-Shopper

How many seconds on average does it take for shoppers to find your brand on the shelf? Is it less than 10 seconds, when 80% of purchase decisions are made? Findability is particularly critical with any pack redesigns, new products, and plan-o-gram changes. …>>

#03

WHY DID PACKAGE REDESIGN

LEAD TO A DECLINE IN BRAND MARKET SHARE...?
V-Shopper

Visual brand properties are the main link between consumers and your brand. 90% of all transmitted information to our brain is visual. Brands exist in our minds mainly as visual snapshots. The 3 Visual Brand Properties highlighted to the right, are what connects brands to consumers …>>

#02

CHALLENGER BRANDS

GAIN A COMPETITIVE EDGE WITH BETTER SHELF IMPACT

In our experience as designers and researchers, brand owners of lower market share brands, tend to go with package designs that visually conform to the category. They seem more preoccupied with fitting in rather than breaking out …>>

PREDICTABLE IN-MARKET

RESULTS

WHITE PAPER

A team of researchers from two different universities partnered with Kraft Foods, Canada, to test V-SHOPPER versus more traditional in-store testing methodologies. They wanted to determine whether this newer, more cost and time efficient online testing methodology could measure shopper behaviour and attention as well as more traditional and expensive in-store testing methodologies. They chose V-SHOPPER for this test because unlike other online testing solutions, only V-SHOPPER has an Ocular Lens feature, a highly effective means of tracking shopper attention online throughout the shopping experience.
Two identical tests were run across 5 food categories with 1172 respondents using V-SHOPPER and in-store shop-along methodologies. V-SHOPPER purchase behaviour was compared against in-store shop-along data. In addition, researchers compared online shopper attention data from V-SHOPPER with normative shopper attention data sourced from many in-store eye tracking studies, to determine the shopper attention efficacy of V-SHOPPER.
Results showed a very strong .85 correlation between purchase behaviour data generated through V-SHOPPER and in-store shop-alongs. Further, researchers concluded that V-SHOPPER’s Ocular Lens was able to demonstrate expected results in most cases versus what was expected based upon normative shopper attention data. Conclusion from the study was that V-SHOPPER is able to provide managers with a more cost and time efficient methodology to examine the actual impact of marketing actions intended to capture shopper’s attention at the retail shelf and to influence behaviour.

Journal of Food Products Marketing, 2016 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10454446.2015.1072869Mark Lang, James Kelley, Kelly Moore (Department of Marketing, Iowa State University)